About Your Tooth Brush

About Your Toothbrush

About Your Toothbrush

Tariq Drabu has advised that your toothbrush could be trying to warn you on your oral health. Tariq Drabu is a leading dentist and specialist oral surgeon. He is also the owner of the successful Langley Dental Practice in Middleton where he caters to private and NHS patients on a daily basis.

This top dentist has advised that many patients don't realise that their toothbrush has more of a story to tell than they realise and seeing the signs and knowing what to look for can help patients improve their oral heath now and moving forward.

Blood on your toothbrush

One of the biggest concerns you should have is noticing blood on your toothbrush after brushing. Tariq Drabu advised that gum disease is a very serious concern for anyone and gingivitis, which is the milder form of gum disease often shows bleeding during brushing. This means that your toothbrush may show signs of blood.

If you do notice blood, seek dental treatment and ensure you brush twice a day, stay away from sugared foods and drinks and use dental floss to get into those hard to reach places between the teeth.

Toothbrush an odd colour

Have you just brushed your teeth and your toothbrush has come up green, dark brown or even caramel colour? Tariq Drabu advised that your toothbrush can pick up food particles left behind after eating, but colour often is a sign of sugars which have attached to the teeth. Green may be a sweet you have just eaten, while dark brown could be chocolate of some kind and caramel colour could be tea or coffee residue. This is a sign that it may be time to cut back a bit.

Worn bristles

If your toothbrush is looking tired, then it is definitely asking you to replace it. Tariq Drabu advised that over time it is common for the toothbrush to wear. If you ignore the worn bristles, then you will find that you are just rubbing the plaque and bacteria around the teeth and not removing it. Worn bristles means replacement.

At the same time, if you notice the bristles are wearing on your toothbrush within a matter of weeks rather than months, you may want to ease up on how hard you are brushing.

Your toothbrush smells bad

A very serious concern, according to Tariq Drabu, is a toothbrush that smells. This can be caused by a host of issues, including bacteria. Make sure you clean your toothbrush after and before every use.

We have dental products at the clinic that suits you  and your family. Just drop by and check them out. See you soon.

Credit:Dentaltown

Harsh-Tooth-Brush-400-x-300-PX

 

Sleeping in Dentures

Sleeping with Your Denture?

Wearing dentures continually, and especially at night when salivary flow naturally diminishes, often results in a condition called denture stomatitis (“stoma” – mouth; “itis” – inflammation). This affects tissues under dentures. Typically it occurs under upper full dentures that cover the palate, which becomes reddened, inflamed and infected with yeast. This is often accompanied by a disease called angular cheilitis, a cracking at the corners of the mouth and subsequent infection by the same yeast. Denture stomatitis is treated by leaving the dentures out at night, and cleaning them meticulously. Yeast infection is treated by anti-yeast or anti-fungal medication and/or chlorhexidine prescription rinses that can be prescribed by your dentist.

Whether you wear full or partial dentures, taking them out at night for sleeping gives the gums and other denture-bearing tissues a chance to rest, recover and receive beneficial exposure to the antibacterial agents naturally present in saliva. In short, removing your dentures at night is the healthiest thing to do.

A good oral hygiene routine for denture-wearers should include the following steps:

  • Remove and rinse your dentures after eating.
  • Brush your dentures at least once a day with a soft toothbrush, nailbrush or denture brush and dish soap, liquid antibacterial soap, or denture cleanser. (Don’t use toothpaste: it is too abrasive.) Using an effervescent (fizzing) tablet can’t substitute for this type of manual cleaning, and it might take some effort to remove the plaque or film that develops on the dentures.
  • Store your dentures in water or, better yet, an alkaline peroxide-based solution made for this purpose.
  • Brush your gums and tongue every day with an extra-soft toothbrush (not the one you use for cleaning your dentures) or clean them with a damp washcloth.
  • Rinse your dentures before putting them back in your mouth.

Even though you no longer have natural teeth, you still need to pay attention to your oral hygiene. Wearing your dentures 24/7 will prevent you from maintaining good oral hygiene, unnecessarily putting your health at risk.

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What is Root Canal

Root Canal Treatment

Rawatan Akar

Root Canal Treatment

Root canal treatment (endodontics) is a dental procedure used to treat infection at the centre of a tooth (the root canal system).

The infection is caused by bacteria that live in the mouth and invade the tooth. This can happen after:

  • tooth decay
  • leaky fillings
  • damage to teeth as a result of trauma, such as a fall

Tooth structure 

A tooth is made up of two parts. The crown is the top part of the tooth that's visible in the mouth. The root extends into the bone of the jaw, anchoring the tooth in position.

Teeth also consist of:

  • enamel – the hard outer coating
  • dentine – a softer material that supports the enamel and forms most of the tooth 
  • cementum – a hard material that coats the root's surface
  • dental pulp – the soft tissue at the centre of the tooth

The root canal system contains the dental pulp and extends from the crown of the tooth to the end of the root. A single tooth can have more than one root canal.

Normal-Tooth-Anatomy

When root canal treatment is needed

Root canal treatment is only required when dental X-rays show that the pulp has been damaged by a bacterial infection. The pulp will begin to die if it's infected by bacteria, allowing the bacteria to then multiply and spread.

The symptoms of a pulp infection include:

  • pain when eating or drinking hot or cold food and drink
  • pain when biting or chewing
  • a loose tooth

As the infection progresses, these symptoms often disappear as the pulp dies. Your tooth then appears to have healed, but the infection has in fact spread through the root canal system.

Further symptoms eventually occur, such as:

  • pain when biting or chewing returning
  • swelling of the gum near the affected tooth
  • pus oozing from the affected tooth
  • facial swelling
  • the tooth becoming a darker colour

It's important to see your dentist if you develop toothache. If your tooth is infected, the pulp can't heal by itself.

Leaving the infected tooth in your mouth may make it worse. There may also be less chance of the root canal treatment working if the infection within your tooth becomes established.

Antibiotics – medication to treat bacterial infections – aren't effective in treating root canal infections.

How root canal treatment is performed

To treat the infection in the root canal, the bacteria need to be removed. This can be done by either:

  • removing the bacteria from the root canal system (root canal treatment)
  • removing the tooth (extraction)

However, removing the tooth isn't usually recommended as it's better to keep as many of your natural teeth as possible.

After the bacteria have been removed, the root canal will be filled and the tooth sealed with a filling or crown. In most cases the inflamed tissue near the tooth will heal naturally.

Before having root canal treatment, you'll usually be given a local anaesthetic. This means the procedure shouldn't be painful and should be no more unpleasant than having a filling.

Root canal treatment is usually successful. In about 9 out of 10 cases a tooth can survive for up to 10 years after root canal treatment.

Read about how root canal treatment is performed.

Recovering from root canal treatment

It's important to look after your teeth when recovering from root canal treatment. You should avoid biting on hard foods until all of your treatment is complete.

After your final treatment, your restored tooth shouldn't be painful, although it may feel sensitive for a few days.

Over-the-counter painkillers, such as paracetamol or ibuprofen, can be used to relieve any discomfort. Return to your dentist if you continue to experience pain or swelling after using painkillers.

In most cases it's possible to prevent the need for further root canal treatment by:

  • maintaining good oral hygiene 
  • not consuming too much sugary food
  • giving up smoking if you smoke

 

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Smoking and Gum Problem

SMOKING AND GUM DISEASE

What Is Gum Disease?

Gum (periodontal) disease is an infection of the gums and can affect the bone structure that supports your teeth. In severe cases, it can make your teeth fall out. Smoking is an important cause of severe gum disease in the United States.

Gum disease starts with bacteria (germs) on your teeth that get under your gums. If the germs stay on your teeth for too long, layers of plaque (film) and tartar (hardened plaque) develop. This buildup leads to early gum disease, called gingivitis.

When gum disease gets worse, your gums can pull away from your teeth and form spaces that get infected. This is severe gum disease, also called periodontitis. The bone and tissue that hold your teeth in place can break down, and your teeth may loosen and need to be pulled out.

Warning Signs and Symptoms of Gum Disease

  • Red or swollen gums
  • Tender or bleeding gums
  • Painful chewing
  • Loose teeth
  • Sensitive teeth
  • Gums that have pulled away from your teeth

How Is Smoking Related to Gum Disease?

Smoking weakens your body's infection fighters (your immune system). This makes it harder to fight off a gum infection. Once you have gum damage, smoking also makes it harder for your gums to heal.

What does this mean for me if I am a smoker?

  • You have twice the risk for gum disease compared with a nonsmoker.
  • The more cigarettes you smoke, the greater your risk for gum disease.
  • The longer you smoke, the greater your risk for gum disease.
  • Treatments for gum disease may not work as well for people who smoke.

Tobacco use in any form—cigarettes, pipes, and smokeless (spit) tobacco—raises your risk for gum disease.

How Can Gum Disease Be Prevented?

You can help avoid gum disease with good dental habits.

  • Brush your teeth twice a day.
  • Floss often to remove plaque.
  • See a dentist regularly for checkups and professional cleanings.
  • Don't smoke. If you smoke, quit.

Source: cdc.gov

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